Bias By Numbers S/S Tee

$38.00

Brand Obey
SKU: 165262708M-BLK-S
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Obey Bias By Numbers S/S Tee

  • WEB EXCLUSIVE EXCLUDED FROM ALL SALES
  • REGULAR FIT CREWNECK TEE WITH SOLID RIB NECK TRIMS
  • FEATURES HEAVYWEIGHT COTTON JERSEY FABRICATION.
  • 100% COTTON

This shirt will fall under our OBEY Awareness program, founded in 2007, in which OBEY will donate all of its profits from the sale of these products. The profits from the sale of these shirts will be split between Black Lives Matter and Know Your Rights COVID-19 Relief Fund. This fight will go beyond the immediate protests. OBEY has, is and, will be committed to this issue. We encourage everyone to take the time to reflect, educate, and demand action to combat the systemic racism that has permeated our culture for too long.

Bias by Numbers addresses racial bias in policing, criminal justice, and media culture. Racial bias in policing and criminal justice has a long history, including stats like – black people being five times more likely to be stopped and searched than white people, and four times more likely to be subjected to unnecessary use of force, or four times more likely to be killed by the police when unarmed. The statistics revealing racial bias in prosecution and sentencing are compelling as well. Though recreational drug use is equally common in both predominantly black communities and predominantly white communities, convictions for drug possession are almost six times higher for blacks. Blacks frequently receive longer prison sentences than whites contributing to African Americans being incarcerated at more than five times the rate of whites.

Racial bias in police enforcement undermines public trust and presents a significant threat to the legitimacy of law enforcement in all communities. However, racial bias as a police issue may be intensified by other cultural factors which are both overt and insidious. Media characterizations of black protesters use words such as “agitators,” “lawless thugs,” “hoodlums” and many more, whereas descriptions of white protesters typically read as individuals “exercising free speech,” “expressing their convictions,” and “showing what democracy looks like.” I hope this art doesn’t just appeal visually but allows viewers to look at the layers of information and facts and think about how to make positive changes to patterns of injustice.

– Shepard